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Free music for independent and non-profit filmmakers, film students

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Back in 2004 Wired Magazine collaborated with 16 musicians asking them to lend their music royalty free to emerging artists meant to use the tracks for non commercial usage and allowing the ability for other artists to burn mix and share their vision. At the time the initiative seemed brave for the early 00´s.

Musician Moby issued a press release on Mobygratis.com inviting independent and non-profit filmmakers, film students, and anyone in need of free music for their independent, non-profit film, video, or short.

From mobygratis.com:

hi,
i’ll keep this brief.
this portion of moby.com, ‘film music’, is for independent and non-profit filmmakers, film students, and anyone in need of free music for their independent, non-profit film, video, or short. To use the site you log in(or on?) and are then given a password. You can then listen to the available music and download whatever you want to use in your film or video or short. The music is free as long as it’s being used in a non-commercial or non-profit film, video, or short. If you want to use it in a commercial film or short then you can apply for an easy license, with any money that’s generated being given to the humane society. I hope that you find what you’re looking for,
-moby

As copyright laws get blurred from country to country the way artist take control of their material has been evolving since 2000 by this the industry takeing a step back and reinventing the rules of the game while figuring out how to promote everyone equally and fairly. Could this be the correct step to help both artists and film makers reach an agreement on the controversial topic of copyright infringement?

Creative Commons on the other hand,  is trying to find a middle ground. In the past two years, the non profit organisation created around a dozen licenses that let artists open their work to others. CC licenses give musicians – as well as authors, designers, and other creators – a flexible, opt-in licensing system, letting them determine what secondary uses are allowed and under what conditions. Work released under a CC license grants before-the-fact permission, so that another musician or artist doesn’t have to call a lawyer before building on or sharing a licensed work. It’s a some-rights-reserved approach, versus the old analogue-age standard of all rights reserved. It’s copyright for the 21st century.

Source: Wire 2004

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